How to cope with dating a workaholic

18-Nov-2015 23:40

I never considered him a workaholic, though, because he loved being home–and when he had to dictate charts or bring work home he was always really grumpy about it.

I try to open discussions with “I/we want to have you at home more.I miss time with you”, but it immediately goes to accusations that I don’t understand his work, his stress, the economy etc.I am tired of pat Christian answers about making my home a sanctuary for him and understanding that work is what God created him to do.I am angry when I hear other Godly men ask with a laugh, “Still working those crazy hours?” instead of calling him on his out of balance life.I have considered talking to an elder couple that we are close to in order to have someone else discuss this with him.

My husband is a good man and I know, in my head if not my heart, that he loves me and his kids, but even as I write this, a voice in my head whispers, “but not enough to cut back his work hours”. She IS married to a workaholic husband, and it’s making her feel so unloved. Here are some general thoughts about workaholism and marriage.

My husband is a physician, and when he was in training he was often at work for 100-120 hours a week, being 36 hours on and 12 hours off. When he had his own practice he was still on call frequently, and his work weeks were still long.

He owns his own business and regularly works 75-90 hours a week.

We have been married almost 30 years and our kids are almost out of the nest.

His obsession with work overrides his common sense.

The kids and I staged an intervention (literally) where we said that they would not ride in his car with him if he continued to text and check emails while driving (that has improved a bit since then). I do, but it has left me to be virtually a single parent, and in fact, an angry, disconnected wife.