Dating a borderline personality woman

21-Oct-2015 18:50

One curious aspect of the manosphere community is it’s tendency to pick up on what I’d call ‘pet pathologies’.

dating a borderline personality woman-49dating a borderline personality woman-18

Most Betas often report a discomfort with approaches and Game in general because of varying degrees of social anxiety that they’ve internalized for the better part of their lives.So, it’s a much simpler premise to attribute this to a psychological disorder than to admit that they’ve got a lot of work ahead of them in unlearning the hinderances the’ve been conditioned to believe about themselves for so long. ) don’t have Asperger’s, but I think some real introspection is due before diagnosing it for themselves.Another neurosis that gets attributed to women in the manosphere is BPD, Borderline Personality Disorder: *DSM-IV-TR Diagnostic Criteria A pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following: Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment.A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation.Identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self.Transient, stress-related paranoid ideation or severe dissociative symptoms.

I struggled with deciding whether to write about this because in our current intergender environment, it’s very easy to conveniently ascribe these symptoms and tendencies to the ‘psycho bitches’ that men often complain about.

She’s crazy in bed, but she’s also crazy out of bed.

Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating).

Note: Do not include suicidal or self-mutilating behavior covered in Criterion 5.

Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior.

Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days). Inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights).